A decent prank, or brilliant viral marketing?

As an adolescent, I played a fair number of pranks on my mother, beginning with the time my father and I switched tables on her at the food court at the mall.  (She was wandering around for a good ten minutes.  It was great.)  Eventually, my parents needed to get a new kitchen sink, one without the little spray nozzle on the side, because every April Fool's Day I would use a rubber band to tie down the nozzle's trigger, dousing her when she went down to the kitchen to start her day.  (Ten years running.  Really, it would have just been easier to check for rubber bands one day a year, no?) The pranks have continued into my 20s. They've been consistently innocent--the false engagement my senior year of college has probably been the highlight--but the response to them has not been.  If there's one thing I've learned, it's that whether I'm greeted with blind anger or a good-natured laugh depends largely on my parents' mood and not at all on what the prank itself is.

Well, I'll never complain  about the response one of my good-natured pranks gets ever again:

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I love the quick aside in the beginning: "This is our drink, Vital Energy--it has as much caffeine as two Red Bulls--and right now we have 26,000 of them in the house."  With one clause, this goes from a horrifically received prank to the family business' most widely seen ad.  That probably helped soften the blow.

For No Good Reason

Flasharound 1: Backing into Lost, One Episode at a Time