Does The Gospel Stop At The Water's Edge?

Last year, I visited an evangelical church deep in the heart of Texas. The sermon was interesting, engaging and literate. The pastor dug deep into a passage in James, drawing out an application that dared his congregation to think about how their church treats the impoverished in their town and how each of them can rethink their relationship to the poor. As a Christian, I liked that his talk plainly took the Bible seriously and would be challenging to everyone in the audience, reminding Christians that they are there because they are broken, not because they are great. As a communicator, I loved that it also would have been perfectly understandable to people with no grounding in the faith. But when I sat with the pastor briefly after the service, the sermon was far from what I wanted to ask him about. Instead, I wanted to talk about the lengthy prayer that preceded it. In his prayer, the pastor prayed for the congregation. He prayed for their town. He asked for protection for America's soldiers overseas. He asked for God's blessing on the work those soldiers were doing. And that was it.

I couldn't help but wonder why he stopped there, why he didn't go on to also pray for the communities to which those soldiers are traveling, why he didn't pray that God's spirit be poured out even on those we might consider our enemies. When Saul converted and became Paul, God demonstrated his ability to transform and redeem people we don't WANT to see transformed or redeemed. If we are honestly praying, "Thy kingdom come," we need to remember that we aren't the only people God wants to turn into citizens of it.

When Christians discuss international issues, we need to be eager to look beyond tribal concerns. The Bible tells us that one day, the righteous of every nation will be part of the same kingdom. The kings of every state will lay their crowns at Christ's feet. Jesus' life, death and resurrection are a testament to the fact that God isn't interested in his blessings stopping at the water's edge.

I asked the Texan pastor about why he structured his prayer that way, and why he didn't pray for the citizens of the countries in which the soldiers were being deployed. In return, he spoke winsomely and graciously about expressing gratitude for a country that has facilitated so many blessings in our lives.

And I don't disagree. But I think Christians need to also model a wider perspective.

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